Anyone else excited about this?

French Press, Vac Pot, Drip or any other - air your views and results

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Postby lsjms » Mon Dec 07, 2009 11:53 am

we all know how complicated the variables are in getting a decent shot, and this just looks as though it is going to make that harder

Totally agree, but I still reckon that with my Zass and home roast beans. I'll be having nicer coffee than at this random cafe, on the edge of the world, near the wild. Unless you are in New Zealand!
That's why I always have an aeropress with me in the alps though. Much easier and lighter than one of these and capable of giving me a full mugs worth to get me going on cold early morning starts before the sun's up.

Interesting, and still a lot of effort? Do you take a grinder? Gouez I know that with you being an alpinist you have to make your trip as painful as possible so you're satisfied once home. :lol:
I on the other hand am a s**t lazy cragrat with time to idle on rest days while my fingertips grow back!
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Postby Gouezeri » Mon Dec 07, 2009 12:33 pm

Ahh, I know where I've seen one of them before... I'm certain that good ol' Cumberpach on here uses one to "avoid clumping in his basket" :wink:

Aeropress and a hand grinder for me (though I do keep a solis 166 back at the campsite). I've seen titanium french presses though! :roll: I could imagine that getting one of these to temp on a glacier might take a while! If I was going to take this to the alps, I would at least need it to make the right noise on my harness and maybe incorporate an ice screw (no, that's not what you're thinking Cakey :P)

I actually do know a few high altitude refuges capable of serving an 'ok' espresso. I also know of plenty of restaurants serving pretty awful espresso down in the valleys! :roll: I suppose in some ways I enjoy this forced vacation from espresso in the Alps, as it makes it all the more sweeter when I return home! That said, there's bugger all decent espresso around here otherwise (sauf toi, amezeg!) Now if we're talking espresso at the crag, then that's a different matter, as I can use my home gear... :D My nearest crag (well cliffs actually ~50 odd routes + bouldering) is only a coupla hundred metres from my front door :twisted:

Seriously though, if we're comparing this to basic gaggias (due to price), then I suppose it has its place. I'd still want something with adjustable pressure and better stability though (both of which are achievable with a gaggia and some modification, at extra cost admittedly). I suppose the one place I could find a use for it, is when eating in other people's homes... "would you like a coffee?" "No. That's OK, I brought my own!" Now that would work!
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Postby lsjms » Mon Dec 07, 2009 2:08 pm

Good commitment, I am VERY impressed by a rucksack containing screws and a grinder. Mark Twight would be horrified! I may have met one of your refugees, I got flooded into Homer hut, Milford Sound and there was a guy with grinder and a lever!
ice screw (no, that's not what you're thinking Cakey )

Have you never done the snowcave-ice-hotel-on-a-budget-smooze? Check the sleeping bags zip together!
Gouez I think we need a climbers thread.

OK seriously, How can you compare this to a gaggia, I know they are similar price but the twist will surely come down once they are through the early adopters. It just seems unfair to pit this against anything over 1kg in weight/fits in drawer. I think if it can rival an ok single boiler the Twist is pure genius....
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Postby Gouezeri » Mon Dec 07, 2009 3:44 pm

Screws in a rucksack? No no no my boy, they are for show... preferably still in their dinky holders! :wink: You put your axe in the rucksack so you can't get to it when you slip :D
Somehow, I always end up with two left handed zips! And I dread to think what the condensation would be like using one of these in a 2 man bothy!

For me, this would just be too much hassle when camping/mountaineering and too much of a compromise. In a kitchen (where I bet most of them will end up, along with all the presso's and handpresso's), I think there are better ways to spend your money, on something that is less portable, but more stable/practical. That said, with the current gaggia issue, I'm not sure what the lower end of the market actually is these days.

What would be interesting is to see how it works with poorly ground coffee, as let's face it, at this end of the market, not many buyers are going to have a decent burr grinder. Or even test it with something like a decent Zass, Porlex or Kyocera to see how well it works with a hand grinder

Having thought about this some more, the obvious market seems to be boats and motorhomes/campervans, where heating water and carrying grinders isn't going to be an issue. That and visiting folks. But when I visit people they always want me to make them coffee anyway :?

I'm waiting for the rest of the HB review to see what the reviewer reckons the market is, along with any comments on the cannisters.

[edit] As for a climbers thread, I don't know if there are any others around here... just look at the size of Cakey for an example of the lack of physical exercise around here! Seeing as you're in London, if you've ever hung out at the castle or the westway, you're bound to have seen me hangdogging my way up :wink:
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Postby lsjms » Mon Dec 07, 2009 4:42 pm

Annoying, this whole conversation has got me thinking about taking a generator, the super jolly and machine to Font next year.

We'll see what HB says.

a climbers thread, I don't know if there are any others around here

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Postby Gouezeri » Mon Dec 07, 2009 4:49 pm

lsjms wrote:Annoying, this whole conversation has got me thinking about taking a generator, the super jolly and machine to Font next year.

Self sufficiency when it comes to coffee in France is highly advisable... I take a roaster and greens from home too.... you should be safe with the water.
Just don't bring any chalk :wink:
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Postby espressomattic » Mon Dec 07, 2009 5:21 pm

lsjms wrote:Totally agree, but I still reckon that with my Zass and home roast beans. I'll be having nicer coffee than at this random cafe, on the edge of the world, near the wild. Unless you are in New Zealand!


Yes it is a burden I admit ;)
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Postby thecatinside » Mon Dec 07, 2009 6:24 pm

lsjms wrote:Good commitment, I am VERY impressed by a rucksack containing screws and a grinder. Mark Twight would be horrified! I may have met one of your refugees, I got flooded into Homer hut, Milford Sound and there was a guy with grinder and a lever!


The very same man came into my mind instantly when I saw mountaineering mentioned. It's about time to take the Extreme alpinism to the 21st century. "If you're feeling cold, grind finer and press harder" :D

Good to know that climbing and coffee goes hand in hand around the world.

I'm usually making my coffee with french press when out. I'm looking into getting an arrarex caravel for next summers longer bouldering trips where electricity is available.
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Postby lsjms » Mon Dec 07, 2009 7:02 pm

The very same man came into my mind instantly when I saw mountaineering mentioned. It's about time to take the Extreme alpinism to the 21st century

I take it you mean Mark-no-food-thanks-plenty-calories-in-olive-oil-Twight, not the guy at Homer hut :lol:
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Postby Tristan » Tue Dec 08, 2009 1:00 am

I think it looks brilliant. Never seen such a quiet extraction, would be great if they made a more commercial version with steam arms etc.

I'm drinking less and less espresso these days (brewing instead) and i'm half tempted to sell my expensive espresso machine and buy one of these! (I wont though)
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