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2015 Aeropress Championship of England
Thursday, February 19, 2015 - 10:08 AM - 1 month, 4 weeks ago   - 1. TMC Members' Coffee Blogs  - James and Anette's Square Mile Weblog
2015 Aeropress Championship of England
We’re very pleased to host the 2015 English Aeropress Championships on March 7, along with Workshop Coffee. 27 competitors have already secured all the available spots, and will battle it out for the crown. The winner of the English heat will go on to represent at the World Aeropress Championships in Seattle. With support from our lovely sponsors The Kernel Brewery and TKC Sales, and food from Miss P’s Barbecue, it’s going to be a good time and we hope to see a full house of spectators cheering on the competitors! The competition will take place here at our roastery at 8 Pritchards road, E2 9AP. Entry to watch, cheer and drink lots of coffee is free, doors will open at 4pm and the competition should kick off at 5pm. See you then!

Aeropress Championship of England 2015
Thursday, February 19, 2015 - 10:08 AM - 1 month, 4 weeks ago   - 1. TMC Members' Coffee Blogs  - James and Anette's Square Mile Weblog
Aeropress Championship of England 2015
We’re very pleased to host the 2015 English Aeropress Championships on March 7, along with Workshop Coffee. 27 competitors have already secured all the available spots, and will battle it out for the crown. The winner of the English heat will go on to represent at the World Aeropress Championships in Seattle. With support from our lovely sponsors The Kernel Brewery and TKC Sales, and food from Miss P’s Barbecue, it’s going to be a good time and we hope to see a full house of spectators cheering on the competitors! The competition will take place here at our roastery at 8 Pritchards road, E2 9AP. Entry to watch, cheer and drink lots of coffee is free, doors will open at 4pm and the competition should kick off at 5pm. See you then!

Brazil 2014: Part 1
Friday, February 13, 2015 - 01:18 PM - 2 months ago   - 1. TMC Members' Coffee Blogs  - James and Anette's Square Mile Weblog
Brazil 2014: Part 1
Our Brazil container lands in the UK today, so since the coffees that I selected in October are now here, I thought it’d be a good time to get the blogpost out about my trip! The largest coffee producing country in the world, you really need more than a couple of weeks on the ground as a buyer to even get to know one state of Brazil’s coffee growing area. But when you’re on a whirlwind schedule you just try to focus in and cram as much as you can into what little time you have. This year I thought I’d start in Belo Horizonte, at the International Coffee Week expo, where exhibitors from all over Minas Gerais would get together to show off their coffee, machinery and equipment, and share their thoughts on the state of the industry. Mechanical Harvester The great thing about coffee shows is that you always run into familiar faces even half way around the world. Such as the lovely Marcos and Felipe Croce of FAF, Stephen Vick from Blue Bottle, and fellow Norwegian Eystein Veflingstad who now lives and works in coffee in Bahia. A couple of days were spent at the show cupping coffees not just from our friends at FAF but from producers and exporters all over Minas, showcasing a wider array of profiles than I had expected and surprising me in the best way. Cupping next to the likes of Bruno Souza, Isabela Raposeiras and Byron Holcomb was great for delving deeper into the nuances of coffees that they cup year round, but I tend to focus on mostly around buying time. The show in Belo Horizonte provided me with a good overview of the coffees I’d encounter on the rest of my trip, but the bulk of it was to be spent visiting exporters and farms so I travelled on to Carmo de Minas where I’d be spending a few days with Carmo Coffees. We have bought a lot of coffee from them in the last few years but this was the first time I had a chance to visit and cup with them, so I prepared for a caffeinated few days. Carmo de Minas is a tiny town so I stayed in nearby Sao Lourenco, enjoying the peaceful pace, friendly street dogs and morning coffees at Jacques Periera Carneiro’s Unique Cafe. Jacques founded Carmo Coffee together with Luiz Paulo Pereira Dias Filho in 2005, and have tirelessly been promoting and raising the profile of Carmo coffees ever since. As they were both in Japan, I was looked after by Gabriel and Calixto who put me straight to work on a table of naturals, from a mix of familiar and new farms. Cupping setup at Carmo I got pretty good with the water guns at Carmo! After two days of cupping I had narrowed it down to a few farms I knew I wanted to bring in, so it was time to drive further into the countryside, have a closer look at their setups and learn more about how they run. IRMAS PEREIRAS First up was the farm nicknamed Irmas Pereiras, owned by sisters Maria Valeria and Maria Rogeria Pereira. They took over the farm after their parents retired, and ventured into specialty coffee by investing in new equipment and exploring new processing methods. One of the machines that have proven particularly useful is their cherry colour sorter, which separates the freshly picked cherries into red, yellow, green and pasa cherries. The more controlled sorting increased their production of high quality naturals from 20% to 40%. Irmas Pereiras is also a working stud ranch The mill at Irmas Pereiras Patios at Irmas Pereiras Some of the horses that are kept on the farm On the way to Sertao we had to navigate some local traffic A common sight in the area, mahogany trees used as shade for the coffee. Safrazero, Zero Harvest Driving up to our next stop, I got an explanation of the safrazero system of pruning coffee that is becoming popular in the area. Brazil has biannual crop cycle, with low yields one year and higher yields the second. It can be very unpredictable, and makes it difficult to manage labour, fertilising plans, picking schedules and pruning patterns. Farms fertilise and harvest their whole farms every year, which in a country like Brazil can be costly. The safrazero pruning and harvesting system, especially useful in mountainous regions, allows more structured and controlled plan for fertilising and harvesting, saving both time and money. Farmers will divide the farms into two areas, let’s call them plot A and plot B. Plot A will be pruned right back, vertical and lateral branches alike. It looks almost as if only the trunks themselves are left standing. The plants of plot A won’t bear fruit that next year, but will be allowed to regenerate, being supplied with the fertilisers needed to stimulate leaf and branch regrowth. The other area, plot B, is allowed to flower and bear fruit for harvest, and is fertilised with the supplements needed for healthy fruit growth. So even if plot A won’t bear fruit that first year, plot B will give a higher yield, making up for the loss of the other. Once harvest is over, plot B gets pruned right back to the trunk, while plot A goes on to flower and bear fruit, having ‘skipped’ a year of producing cherries, but now growing near twice as many of them on the new, young shoots that have emerged. Some farmers even combine the pruning with the harvest, cutting the branches off with the cherries on them, the removing the cherries afterwards. And so the cycle continues, half the farm resting one year and producing the next, the other half doing the same but on the opposite cycle. Safrazero’ed trees, pruned of both vertical and lateral branches SERTAO We have bought a fair bit of coffee from Sertao for the last few years, so I was really looking forward to visiting. The Sertao group owns and manages farms that combined count some 860.000 trees. It’s a family owned group, run by the children of Jose Isidro and Nazareth Pereira. Their four kids, Francisco, Luiz Paulo, Glycia and Sandra, all work for Sertao, as do two of Francisco’s four children, while a third, a daughter, is learning to cup. Driving into Sertao Once we got into the Sertao grounds we met with Franciso at a beautiful lookout they had built in a huge Jacaranda tree, with viewing platforms and little plackets saying welcome in different languages. The Welcome Tree From the tree you could see the Sertao mill and the small Santa Ines plot of 100 year old trees that almost got torn out of the ground, until they produced the cherries that won the 2005 COE with 95.85 points. Last year they did the safrazero pruning on this plot, so there hasn’t been a harvest to speak of, however they’re excited to see how this method will affect trees of this age for next year. View of the 100 year old Santa Ines plot They family have continued to plant more trees in time with market demand, and are favouring planting new land at higher altitudes rather than refreshing ageing, lower altitude plots. The trees are very densely planted and look more like rows of coffee hedges than the more individually spaced trees I see in Central America. Dense rows of coffee View of Sertao Mill Francisco Pereira After admiring the view for a bit I was lucky enough to get a tour of the old farm house at Sertao, where lots of the family’s memorabilia is kept. Sertao house Nazareth, the woman who started it all. Also a passionate and very successful cattle breeder! A sign over the front door View of the mill from the house The farm dog taking a cooling stroll along the water channels The old stables at Sertao SANTA LUCIA As we drove on to to check out the Santa Lucia mill, a tiny bit of rain finally fell, giving much needed water to the fields of coffee on either side of the road. The differences in pruning was evident, on one side you’d see the trees that had been safrazero’ed last year (to be the 2015 crop) and this year (to be the 2016 crop). The difference a year makes: on the left hand side of the road are trees that were safrazeroed in 2014 year and won’t bear fruit till 2016, and on the left hand side are trees that were safrazeroed in 2013 and will bear fruit in 2015. The Santa Lucia mill lies at lower altitude and in a valley, and has little coffee in its immediate proximity. They use a Penagos mill, preserving water, and another of their interesting machines is the Centriflux- a pulp centrifuge of sorts. After pulping, running the parchment through the centriflux reduces the mucilage to 30-40% moisture, saving 3-4 days off the patio drying time. Instead of subjecting the coffee to the heat of the guardiolas, this dries the coffee in a more efficient manner without making the quality suffer. Santa Lucia mill Centriflux Penagos pulper Outside of harvest, when there is no cherries on the patio, it is taken over by the neighbours! Just passing over the patios to the next pasture! Cows in sunset Instead of turning the parchment by walking through with rakes, these guys found a motorised option. Coffee elevator conveyors PEDRALVA We also had the chance to stop by a mill owned by Carmo themselves, purchased 5 years ago from the Furnas Farm. Under the new name of Pedralva, they now process 10-15.000 bags from several farms in the area, using both patio and guardiola drying. Wood from the pruning at farms fuel the guardiolas, and a couple of the patios were covered in a greenhouse structure. A few raised beds were also under construction. Pedralva mill and patios Raised drying beds under construction Guardiolas, big ‘tumble driers’ for parchment coffee Pedralva offices with new greenhouse covered drying patio next door. SITIO SAO JOAQUIM One farm that I didn’t have the chance to cup coffees from, but had a great opportunity to visit, was Sitio Sao Joaquim. We met up with Jesimar de Oliveira Sandi, one of the 3rd generation of the Oliveira Sandi family of coffee growers who have had great success in the COE with their family farms. At 1380masl, the farm only produces microlots, and Jesimar attributes the quality of the coffee to their healthy yellow catuai stock, good altitude and north east facing aspect. His pride and a bit of friendly competition was evident as he pointed out a higher lying but south west facing farm on the other side of the valley, which had placed behind them in the COE. In addition to a drive around the fields that were first planted in 1953, I also got a tour of the beautiful farm house where I got to play with 2 of the gorgeous rescue dogs that Jacimar had adopted, finally a chance to get some quality dog time! Jesimar and his awesome car! I wouldn’t have thought it, but it actually made a really great farm vehicle! An example of how uneven rain, flowering and ripening presents a challenge for pickers Pasa drying on the branches The old bread oven at Sao Joaquim. I want one at the roastery! Sao Joaquim farm house View at entrance to farm Some of the residents Selfie with dog. You know me, it’s gotta be done!

Coffee Brewing Class from ChefSteps
Thursday, February 05, 2015 - 11:38 PM - 2 months, 1 week ago   - 1. TMC Members' Coffee Blogs  - WBC 2007 World Champion James Hoffmann's jimseven
Coffee Brewing Class from ChefSteps
I am excited about the launch of a new coffee class from ChefSteps. If you follow me on twitter or elsewhere then you’ve likely noticed how much of a fan I am of what ChefSteps are doing. I genuinely think they’re one of the most innovative and interesting companies in food, and I can’t think of anyone else pushing out as much information for free. Their videos have made techniques that I had previously thought too difficult, or intimidating, seem approachable – and cooking from their recipes has resulted in some of the best meals of my life. Hopefully you’ve already enrolled in the ChefSteps espresso class – if you haven’t you should do so now because it is free and because it is incredibly good. I’d been talking to the team at ChefSteps for a little while about a coffee brewing class. I think their approach and style would be a great way to communicate both the techniques and the knowledge required to brew delicious coffee. While in Seattle last year, with Ben Kaminsky, we shot some videos covering techniques and discussion, and since then the class has been built up to be exhaustive and I think genuinely innovative. That class goes live today: ChefSteps Coffee Class ($14) So what’s included in the class? For the beginner: There’s a great, thorough introduction to brewing better coffee covering buying coffee, getting the right equipment, an overview of dialling in, a guide to tasting and then techniques videos and guides covering French Press, Aeropress, and pour over. We cover what extraction is, why it matters and how to control it. Aeropress brewing For the knowledgeable coffee brewer: You might think that if you’re already brewing tasty coffee at home then there’d be nothing for you here. I would disagree. There’s plenty of stuff in the course that I think would appeal to readers of this blog: rapid cold brew, Liars Latte (everything people like about milk drinks without any milk of any kind) and also some useful techniques to improve the quality of the ground coffee you brew with – regardless of the grinder you are using. There’s also a technique involving rinsing for french press brewing that had me utterly intrigued when they first sent through a little phone video of them doing it, and is the result of what happens when very smart food people start looking at coffee seriously. Easily the cleanest cup of french press you’ve ever had – completely sludge free. The not-chocolate chocolate They also get into that difficult realm: coffee as a culinary ingredient. There are several recipes here, some simple and useful, through to a whole new thing that is chocolate made without cacao and is my favourite thing on the whole course. I’m sure that if you work in coffee and watch this technique you’re going to get pretty excited too. If you’ve bought a ChefSteps class before, or enrolled in one before, then you’ll have noticed that classes continue to be developed after launch – recipes get added, techniques further explored. I love that they do this, so it is worth returning to the class after finishing it. There’s a great community around ChefSteps online – and I’d recommend getting involved there too, especially if you have any interest in cooking better, and understanding the theory behind the techniques in the kitchen. It is one of better discussion forums out there, and I suspect a lot of coffee people have a strong culinary interest too. I hope you check out the class, it’s about the same price as a bag of coffee ($14), and I think that it’s a worthwhile investment. ChefSteps Coffee Brewing Class

An Interview With Brian and Peter from Kenya Kariga pt 2
Wednesday, February 04, 2015 - 04:32 AM - 2 months, 1 week ago   - 1. TMC Members' Coffee Blogs  - Steve Leighton's HasBean Weblog
As part of my traveling I meet some interesting people, non more so than Peter (farm manager of Kariga) and Brian estate owner. I walked with them for many hours and recorded some of our conversations I hope you enjoy them listen to ‘Kenya Kariga pt2’ on audioBoom

An Interview With Brian and Peter from Kenya Kariga
Monday, January 26, 2015 - 12:59 PM - 2 months, 3 weeks ago   - 1. TMC Members' Coffee Blogs  - Steve Leighton's HasBean Weblog
As part of my traveling I meet some interesting people, non more so than Peter (farm manager of Kariga) and Brian estate owner. I walked with them for many hours and recorded some of our conversations I hope you enjoy them

An Interview with Simon Gakinya
Wednesday, January 21, 2015 - 08:54 AM - 2 months, 3 weeks ago   - 1. TMC Members' Coffee Blogs  - Steve Leighton's HasBean Weblog
On my Kenya Travels I meet up with simon Gakinya mills manager at Sangana Mills in Kenya, and I got talking and set a voice recorder going, and this happened.

A look at last year’s prediction
Thursday, January 15, 2015 - 03:18 PM - 3 months ago   - 1. TMC Members' Coffee Blogs  - WBC 2007 World Champion James Hoffmann's jimseven
A look at last year’s prediction
I used to do annual predictions, and then I stopped but apparently I couldn’t quite give up the habit as last year I made some predictions about the C-market , and the coffee market in general in 2014. So let’s have a look and see where I was right and (as usual) wrong: We’re going to see less coffee from Central American producers ongoing. This is, so far, looking to be fairly accurate. Crop years get confusing (we’re going to be receiving the 2014 crops of Centrals this year…). Data comes from the ICO: 1 We saw a further decline (13.4% decrease, down nearly a quarter on two years before) in Central American coffee primarily due to rust. There has been some recovery – but this year’s crop figure will give better insight into whether we lost some producers along with the drop in yields. Hopefully the demand from speciality will drive the prices for high quality coffees up, ideally to the point where growing good coffee is sensible and sustainable. Hard to speak across an industry. This was certainly true for the prices paid at work. We’re going to see more coffee from Colombia. It seems like the rust resistant varieties are starting to kick in, and Colombia’s production is up. This has been borne out – both Colombia’s production and its exports are up. More data from the ICO: You can see from the previous table that Colombia’s production has been back above 12 million bags for the last couple of years, after the drop caused by rust. Notable is the amount of coffee exported which was jumped quite dramatically, despite a 2% increase in production there was an 18% increase in exports. Brazil’s production is going to be sufficiently large that it will continue to squash the commodity price. This where it all falls down. Brazil’s crop wasn’t as expected, the drought making news around the world. Looking at the traditional cycle of crops this should have been a big crop year, a record crop year in fact. It wasn’t: You can see from the chart that this was a year that bucked the on/off cycle trend. As a result the market was a lot more volatile in the last twelve months and prices went back up. Predicting weather is something I am not good at, nor are humans in general beyond a relatively short timeframe. Whether we want to bring climate change into this as a potential factor may be worth considering, as this was the driest period on record since they started recording 84 years ago. I haven’t seen much in the way of predictions for next year’s crop yet, and I have no idea how much other countries are looking to produce. It does seem that the expected consumption for 2013 pretty much matches production, and with an annual growth rate of 2% it also seems likely we’ll have a year in 2014 in which more coffee was consumed than produced. I also made a few other predictions: Supermarket/grocery store coffee is going to remain pretty cheap. I would expect it to increase with inflation/cost of living but to look increasingly cheap compared to speciality. Not successful here either, or maybe a little bit so. Smuckers, a large US company, put up their prices(9%) and saw a large decrease in sales. Kraft also put up their prices (10%), and the market saw a shift to cheaper coffee. Which means cheaper coffee was at least sufficiently plentiful. I don’t know of an index that compares typical specialty prices to commoditised coffee prices at retail (we’d have to define speciality first I suppose) but I don’t think any serious speciality company decreased their prices this year (evidence to the contrary welcome!) Wholesalers of lower quality coffee will once again be able to leverage free-on-loan equipment more aggressively, as it will be easier to hide the margin necessary in the price of the coffee. I did see a little more of this in London. I continue to see free equipment as a way to bribe a business into overpaying for low quality coffee. I don’t think it is smart long term business. Roasters, and coffee shops, will have some decisions to make. With the gap between speciality and commodity likely to widen then the choices may be to go premium, to go mass market or to try and bridge both. In truth this is probably a low priority decision to make for many cafes. A more important decision is probably whether things like multi-roaster purchasing/guest espresso are as profitable and worthwhile as they’d like them to be. I’m hoping to manage a coherent and ideally neutral post on the subject at some point soon. I don’t think we’ll see the wider industry embrace certifications again. Maybe I am just not talking to the same people but I feel that 2014 was a year wherein no-one really talked about certifications. Consumers, cafes, roasters, importers – I just didn’t really hear anyone say anything about them. I should probably track down some sales data on this… So – a mixed bag of predictions and speculation. Make of it what you will. For the sake of being complete here’s a quick chart showing the C-market prices in 2014: I don’t really feel in a predicting mood for 2015, but that may change later in the month – who knows! This data comes from the September newsletter here: pdf . For their free newsletter keep an eye on this page . ↩︎ This data comes from the September newsletter here: pdf . For their free newsletter keep an eye on this page .

Workflows and Software
Monday, January 12, 2015 - 02:00 PM - 3 months ago   - 1. TMC Members' Coffee Blogs  - WBC 2007 World Champion James Hoffmann's jimseven
Workflows and Software
This post has nothing to do with coffee. It is all about software, and how I work. If this is not of interest then stop reading now. You’ve been warned! I like technology, I like software. Often, when chatting with various people in the coffee industry the subject has ended up on software, tools and productivity. I usually rant for a bit, and afterwards several people have told me that I ought to write a blog post on this stuff. I have avoided doing it for years, but I figured I will do it now. So, here is a blog post about software I like and how I use it day to day. I should make clear from the start that for the last seven or eight years I’ve been using hardware from Apple. I’m aware of the downsides of their walled garden approach, I’m annoyed also that their software quality has undeniably been declining over the last couple of years especially. Nonetheless I’m happy enough with the software people are writing to stay for now. As such links will be to iOS and OSX software. The outboard brain I’m a big believer in the outboard brain – a place to store all the things you need to do, to remember, to research etc. I find getting as much of it out, onto paper or into software, to reduce my stress levels and ultimately make me happier. For this I use OmniFocus. OmniFocus is expensive, painfully so – though I see it as less expensive than most of the mistakes I’m likely to make (and what price is happiness). It kills me that the iPhone app is separate to the iPad app , which is separate to the OSX app . However, they all sync together well. At first glance it is a glorified to-do list, but it goes a bit further. You can add key bits of metadata to each task – Project (what this task is working towards or part of) and Context (where you will be to perform this task). That way I can look at my to-do list different ways very easily, for example I have a context of “amazon” for everything I must remember to buy the next time I’m shopping on there. Or I have different contexts for colleagues, so I remember what I need to talk to them about when I next meet with them. Increasingly I try to block out certain amounts of my working day to focus on specific projects, so looking at a specific to-do list for things like Coffee Jobs Board or this blog is great. The app has a section called the “Inbox” where you can dump in ideas before you add the relevant data to it. This is great for moments of inspiration, things to research, recommendations (restaurants, bars, books, films, music) etc etc… You can add images to tasks too, which I use quite a lot when I see inspiring pieces of design. I’m really only scratching the surface here – there’s a lot more you can do if you’re willing to invest some time into this stuff. As I said – £63 ($96) for all three apps is a lot of money in the software world (these days anyway) but I love it to death. (I will spare you the rant about how I’m anti free software, and believe strongly in paying for things.) Omnifocus 2 iPhone – £13.99 Omnifocus 2 iPad – £20.99 Omnifocus 2 OSX – £27.99 Email I hate email, I really do. I’ve been campaigning for years to convince people it should cost money to send emails (we’d all send and receive a lot less, and yet we’d communicate everything necessary and ultimately be more productive…) Anyway – they’re not going away so I look for as much help as possible managing them. On the phone: For quite a while I was using an app called Dispatch that I think is great. There’s lots of genuinely useful functionality (I like all things like Text Expander though I never did quite get my head around their iPhone app). Recently my main email address has switched to using Google Apps which means I’ve been trying out a few new apps. Mailbox is easily the best (though only works if you have a Gmail backed account) On the iPad: Before using Mailbox for the iPad I was actually just using the default Apple Mail client. Software development rates and releases for the iPad are pretty depressing in a number of fields. On the Mac: I’m using Mailbox on there too for now but only to play around with (as it is still in Beta). I’m mostly using a rather lovely client called MailMate that is super geeky and wonderful. It is expensive, it isn’t pretty, it is incredibly powerful (especially the search – should you, like me have ludicrous numbers of emails) and it lets me write emails in Markdown (which is hopefully the nerdiest thing I will write in this post). Services I’m a big fan of Pinboard , when it comes to boookmarking. I love TextExpander for helping me with all sorts of things – I use stock email replies a lot less, but it has a million other uses. I’m painfully reliant on Alfred for doing or finding anything on my mac. Prey Project was also recommended to me a few years ago, and there is an iOS app now too. I’d recommend people install this as its a useful piece of antitheft software. It’s clever, unobtrusive, free and I hope never to have to use it. Other apps I think are good iOS: Tweetbot 3 – Best iPhone and desktop app for me. I like the iPad one too, but it hasn’t been updated for ages and looks pretty dated. Tweetbot 3 is intuitive, pretty, I don’t see sponsored tweets, mute is a great function etc etc. Reeder 2 – I’d used this app for ages, then I went through a phase of post-GReader experimentation and ended up using back here using this as the front end of a Feedly account. I keep an eye on a lot of RSS feeds, which probably makes me a bit old school, but this is a great way of managing and consuming them. Byword – I use this for writing blog posts and drafts of talks. It syncs across iOS and mac devices through iCloud so something I start writing on the bus gets finished on my laptop at the dining room table. Simple, wonderful. VSCOCam – easily my favourite photo editor, though I prefer the functionality of Manual for actually taking photos. Day One – I find writing a journal very rewarding, and it’s something I wish I did better. I love that this syncs between all devices and the desktop so I can write things in the back of taxis, on planes or sat in bed. 1Password – I don’t know most of my passwords, and that’s how it should be. Not enough people take password security seriously enough, and I certainly didn’t used to. Now all my passwords are all held in this app, synced everywhere and secure. 1 Most people’s password security is pretty terrible (great article on passwords here ) so I try to do a little better. I’ve held off writing this thing because I’ve always thought it wasn’t interesting to most people reading here. However, after enough requests I have given in. I will probably come back and update this from time to time. Or as secure as one might hope these days. ↩︎ Or as secure as one might hope these days.

2014 in review – number edition
Sunday, January 11, 2015 - 11:30 AM - 3 months, 1 week ago   - 1. TMC Members' Coffee Blogs  - WBC 2007 World Champion James Hoffmann's jimseven
2014 in review – number edition
I thought it might be fun to look back at this year via a few numbers that make up different parts of my life. Words published in the atlas: 74,803 I’d love to do copies sold, but I have no idea and don’t find out until March.1 I’m still a little bit amazed that I actually wrote the thing, and I have a new found love of hashtags as people’s use of them on services like Instagram has allowed me to see the book pop up all over the place. It really does make me happy to see so many photos of it. When I was travelling this year lots of people were asking about this, so I’m hoping to announce a number of translations and release dates in the next few months, which I’m very excited about. Words written on the blog: 18,240 I’m sometimes surprised that I write as much as I do on here. If I hadn’t looked at the stats I would have guessed at barely half of this. I feel like I did nothing but talk about new projects on here, which isn’t really the point of this site – so less of that next year. 2 I’ve been rightly taken to task about my petulant failure with the learning project. I misjudged its failure, and as such would like to bring it back this year. I’m also working up a few videos, seeing as the old videocasts have been lost forever. Some will readdress some old topics, some will be new things. Flights taken: 44 / Distance flown: 69,788 miles I fly a lot, and I have pretty mixed feelings about this. In the past I’ve done carbon footprint calculations to offset this, but even that felt pretty trivial. Doing what I do requires a lot of travel, but I can’t help but wonder at which point it will feel unsustainable to travel as much. Parts of it are enormously fun, and other parts require me reminding myself that I am at work and not necessarily supposed to be enjoying myself. Balance is important though – and working a little harder on improving that balance is important for me this year. Countries visited: 16 I got to spend more time in Asia in 2014, and I finally got to visit China for the first time. It was fascinating, especially as you can’t help but feel that the wider coffee industry seems to believe that China is the land of opportunity. I’m waiting for coffee’s version of the California Gold Rush, though I think many people will find it to be a market entirely different from their expectations. Applications processed via Coffee Jobs Board: 14,905 This is my favourite metric to look at when I login in to the back end of the website . I’m very proud of what this site has achieved so far. It isn’t bad for a new website, a little more than 6 months old. However, it is still well below its potential in terms of connecting people with employers and opportunities outside of the UK. I’d like to see the site flourish in 2015, so will be devoting a little more of my time and resources to it. My goal is for that number to be 50,000 by 31st of December. Things that can’t be measured I’m not sure at what point in my life I started planning an entire year ahead, but looking ahead I realise I’m going to be very busy. This is also the year where I intend to take a humane number of days holiday – I cannot stress how much of a mistake I consider my failure to take time off properly to be. With things like the Victoria Arduino Gravimetric launch, Re:co and more already lined up I know I’m going to be busy. Then there are a couple more little projects I’m hoping to get going this year too… Image credit: e y e / see It’s second run in the UK has sold out though, which is good! ↩︎ About a year ago, I wrote in a blog post : “In 2014 I want to follow through on things, achieve things and feel productive.” – sometimes it is nice to look back and feel like you did what you said you would ↩︎ It’s second run in the UK has sold out though, which is good!About a year ago, I wrote in a blog post : “In 2014 I want to follow through on things, achieve things and feel productive.” – sometimes it is nice to look back and feel like you did what you said you would

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